"I am worried that some schools are simply spending thousands of dollars on laptops and devices without any real thought behind their use or changing the pedagogy of the teachers using them."

Denise Jeffs, Australia | daily edventures

A thousand times: YES.

(via world-shaker)

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

116 notes

Dropping Knowledge in The Classroom.

 Whether you think you’ve got the answer, or just a lot of questions, Dropping Knowledge is the online place for you.

http://www.droppingknowledge.org/bin/home/home.page

Youth, skills & work: What type of education for today’s youth?

youth-skills-work:

By Armande Désirée Koffi-Kra (25, Côte d’Ivoire) Version française.

I live in Abidjan and I am a student in Côte d’Ivoire. I am currently doing a Masters in Governance and Ethics, specializing in Peace and Conflict Management at the Centre of Research and Action for Peace…

16 notes

creativemornings:

CreativeMornings/Zurich wants to know! This was the question posed at their last CreativeMornings event held at the Zurich International School. Speakers included Bentley, Dilworth and several students.
Check out photos from the event and of other Icebreaker tags in their Flickr Album to see what people answered. All photos were taken by Philipp Küng.
How do you encourage yourself to think creatively and critically?

creativemornings:

CreativeMornings/Zurich wants to know! This was the question posed at their last CreativeMornings event held at the Zurich International School. Speakers included Bentley, Dilworth and several students.

Check out photos from the event and of other Icebreaker tags in their Flickr Album to see what people answered. All photos were taken by Philipp Küng.


How do you encourage yourself to think creatively and critically?

(Source: creativemornings)

26 notes

gjmueller:

Components of a 21st century classroom
Embiggen

gjmueller:

Components of a 21st century classroom

Embiggen

27 notes

creativemornings:

The desire to learn is really the only thing that you should have picked up in college.
Jessica Hische, Letterer, Illustrator and Designer speaking at CreativeMornings/Vancouver (*watch the talk)

creativemornings:

The desire to learn is really the only thing that you should have picked up in college.

Jessica Hische, Letterer, Illustrator and Designer
speaking at CreativeMornings/Vancouver (*watch the talk)

(via creativemornings)

99 notes

"The person who wins the Nobel Prize is not the person who read the most journal articles and took the most notes on them. It’s the person who knew what to look for. And cultivating that capacity to seek what’s significant, always willing to question whether you’re on the right track — that’s what education is going to be about, whether it’s using computers and the Internet, or pencil and paper, or books."

Noam Chomsky on the Purpose of Education via Brain Pickings (via underpaidgenius)

(via noam-chomsky)

60 notes

creativemornings:

Your work is going to stand out if you love it, it’s cool, and you have a mastery of it.
Victoria Davis, of Space Dog Books speaking at CreativeMornings/Los Angeles (*watch the talk)

creativemornings:

Your work is going to stand out if you love it, it’s cool, and you have a mastery of it.

Victoria Davis, of Space Dog Books
speaking at CreativeMornings/Los Angeles (*watch the talk)

(via creativemornings)

64 notes

Redefine “Better”

willrichardson:

I’m constantly provoked by Umair Haque’s essays in the Harvard Business Review, and his bit on “Declare Your Radicalness” is no exception. The whole essay is definitely worth the read, as are many of the comments, but as is often the case, there was one line that really jumped out:

“…We can’t merely call for a set of broken institutions to work slightly better, to restore the present to the state of the past. We’ve got to redefine better; to redesign the future.”

This isn’t news; I’ve been harping about the problems with settling for “better” for a while now. We need different, not better, and I think that’s what Haque is advocating for here as well. As in:

  • We don’t need better assessments; we need different assessments that help us understand students as learners and constructors of their own ongoing education instead of knowers of information and narrow skills.
  • We don’t need better teachers; we need different teachers who see their roles as master learners first and content guides or experts second. 
  • We don’t need better schools; we need different schools that function as communities of inquiry and learning instead of delivery systems for a highly proscribed, traditional curriculum.

And so on…

Are these ideas radical? For some, I’m sure they are. And I know there is a lot more radical thinking about “education” out there than I can come close to. But the idea of a fully networked, progressive learning environment would for the vast majority constitute different and would require us, as Haque suggests, to redefine the future. 

9 notes